Photo of the Day: Jehol Sahraoui, Jilfan from Mrs. Bergmann’s breeding in Tunisia

By Edouard Aldahdah

Posted on December 6th, 2009 in Algeria, Tunisia

I “stole” this picture from the Internet, but it’s for a good cause. This is Jehol Sahraoui (Ouaffar x Kalthoumia by Sabour), for a long time the head sire at Mrs. Gisela Bergmann’s stud in Ghardimaou in western Tunisia. Mrs. Bergman has bred precious ‘old’ Tunisian lines for some thirty years, and Jehol Sahraoui, born in 1978, is representative of these lines. He hails from a very rare sire line in Tunisian/Algerian breeding, that of El Managhi, imported from Hama (Central Syria) by the French to their Algerian Stud of Tiaret in 1924. His dam line, that of Dolma-Batche, is even rarer, and I don’t think it survives away from Mrs. Bergmann’s small breeding (to be checked). Note that the Jilfan (no marbat recorded) line of Dolma-Batche, chesntut, born in 1869, imported to Sidi-Thabet in Tunisia in 1876, is a different line from the Jilfan Dhawi line to  which was imported from the Syrian desert to Tiaret in Algeria in 1875.  A number of good horses trace to Dolma-Batche, including the beautiful Sumeyr, who was featured on this blog before. Jehol is now represented by his son Tchad (b. in 1986 out of Binasr, who is by Koraich and Hadia). The pretty Hadia was featured here.

9 Responses to “Photo of the Day: Jehol Sahraoui, Jilfan from Mrs. Bergmann’s breeding in Tunisia

  1. I’m more and more impressed by these Tunesian horses. Not only some of todays remaining horses seem to be very attractive horses, the historical pictures of the French imports show horses of much better quality than the early imports. I find them much more impressive than for instance most of the Crabbet desert imports (we’re talking of course of a few decades later and photography might have imporoved. Found another picture of this stallion here http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c344/foraminifera/homepage/tun2.jpg

  2. Wow! WHAT A HORSE. If we could turn back time. Your photo shows a beautifu front end and the other shows excellent tail carriage and rear end. Very impressed here.

  3. I have always believe that the Tunisian, and even more the Algerian Arabian horses are some of the most under-recognized of all. In addition to classic true desert type, they have a lot of physical abilities in both endurance and speed.

  4. As you know, I am finding these North African Arabians fascinating, and really am attracted to this stallion, especially.

  5. Hi, I own an son of this stallion. His name is Haouès and we live in Germany, around Stuttgart. I used to ride on Jehol and his relatvises many times, when in Tunesia for horse trails. He was a wonderful horse as well as his whole family – especially his half-brother Marzouk who meant my dreams about Arabian horses come true.

  6. Hi Doris, good to know, and welcome to this blog! Many readers are committed to preserving Tunisian Arabians and so am I. Do you have a picture of Haoues?

  7. When we’re talking about Jehol, we should’nt forget his father Ouaffar. He was bred by the Frenchman Mr. Lovy, near the desert in an very harsh inviroment. Ouaffar has in his 10-year-racing-career 13 outright wins and 41 placings!

    Doris stallion Haoues carries 2 lines to Ouaffar and 3 lines Kraima.

    Stephan

  8. I own a son of Jehol his name is El Bedoui born in 1992 by Jehol Sahraoui X Lafita Rajaia I am very proud and happy of this. His the only son in Tunisia I think after Tchad was died .I have photos to send.

  9. thank you Samia, please send them to me at ealdahdah@hotmail.com

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