Photo of the Day: AtticusLa photo du jour: Atticus

By Ambar

Posted on September 23rd, 2009 in General

Blog contributor RJ Cadranell with his 1980 Davenport stallion, Atticus. I’m guessing Edouard is having a busy few days, so I thought I’d try to collect photos of participants here on horseback. If you have a photo to share, feel free to mail it to ambar@ambararabians.com.

I also realized after my initial posting that this is a response to Joksimovic’s recent question:

hello ! Dont misunderstand me but everybody talk about horses line ,pedigree,generation ,etc
Nobody about riding this daughter of wind, the character of this good horses why ??Its to believe
thats nobody riding .Why have or need the bedouin this horses ?
And why they are what they are (very good horses) ???? (gazu)ride of long distances or what do you think? Maybe this horse is not for riding??
Thank you

Joksimovic, you have an excellent point. This horse is absolutely for riding. It’s always good to be reminded what all this effort and verbiage is actually for.

Blog contributor RJ Cadranell with the 1980 Davenport stallion, Atticus. I’m guessing Edouard is having a busy few days, so I thought I’d try to collect photos of participants here on horseback. 🙂 If you have a photo to share, feel free to mail it to ambar@ambararabians.com

4 Responses to “Photo of the Day: AtticusLa photo du jour: Atticus

  1. Thanks a lot for filling in, dear Ambar..

  2. Atticus arrived at our place as a 24-year-old stallion that hadn’t been trained to do much other than breed mares and lead. I decided to start him under saddle, and although he had some physical limitations by that age, I think we both enjoyed it. I know I did.

  3. RJ,

    I think his pride and his contentment in his work are both visible here.

  4. Hi Ambar. Love these pictures! Regarding your response to Joksimovic I would just like to add that not only are these horses good for riding, they just might be the best. My mare Julia had an uncanny ability to read my mind. I have no doubt that she “thought” and assessed situations. I’m not anthropomorphizing
    here. Obviously she wasn’t “thinking” in a human way. Nonetheless she was able to take in information, process it and react in ways other horses I have ridden would never have done. These horses are real partners no matter what you are doing with them. But then everyone here already knows that…:)

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